Tough Times Don’t Last

May 19, 2020

A Message from the Principal Our high school yearbook advisor asked me to share my thoughts on this school year for a “blurb” in the yearbook. I wanted to share what I wrote to the St. Patrick High School students who were here for the 2019-20 school year.   As we started the 2019-20 school […]

A Message from the Principal

Our high school yearbook advisor asked me to share my thoughts on this school year for a “blurb” in the yearbook. I wanted to share what I wrote to the St. Patrick High School students who were here for the 2019-20 school year.

 

As we started the 2019-20 school year, I reflected on all that had happened throughout the previous school year. We had 16 snow days, a flood, a gas leak, and a power outage day. We had missed so many days of school that year that the Office of Catholic Schools for the Diocese of Grand Rapids required us to make up some of those days. I thought to myself, there is no way possible that we can have a crazier school year than the previous one.

 

Throughout the winter months, we only had one snow day and one two-hour delay. I could not help but think as spring neared that wow, this has really been a tame year with very little adversary. Little did I know what was about to hit. Within one week of having that thought, the governor of our great state issued an Executive Order forcing us to close school for three weeks which ended up leading to closing school for the remainder of the year.

 

I was amazed at the ease at which our high school staff and our students, working together with the support of our parents so easily transitioned to distance learning. It made me realize what a blessing we have here at St. Patrick School with such great students, teachers, and our school families.

 

Throughout the shutdown, I came into my office and worked each day. It was easy at first but became more difficult each day as I missed seeing the students in the building. I missed greeting them at the doorway each morning, seeing and talking to them in the hallways and around the school, stopping into the classrooms to see what they were learning, and going to watch them participate in extracurricular activities. I especially missed participating in those annual rites of passage for our senior class as their high school careers come to a successful completion.

 

Unfortunately, over my 12 years serving as administrator at St. Patrick School, I have come to take all the blessings we have here for granted. The opportunity to work with our students, to work with our school and parish staff, the opportunity we have to pray each day and attend Mass each week. Finally, the wonderful support we have from our school families and our parish community. We have countless blessings to be thankful for and we should always be mindful of them and all that we have.

 

I look forward to the day that all will return to normal and the teachers and students will once again fill our hallways with laughter, joy, excitement, and an eagerness to see friends, and learn new lessons. I hope and pray for the Class of 2020 as they move on with their lives and begin anew this journey we call life. Thank you to all of our high school students for being the great individuals you are. Thank you, Class of 2020, for great high school careers and for your great leadership.

 

Tough times don’t last but tough people do. Keep the faith that better days are ahead. We will persevere. We are Shamrocks!

Read More...

Take Time to Thank Your Child’s Teacher

May 4, 2020

In case you were not aware, the week of May 4-8 was officially designated as Teacher Appreciation Week. The first week of May is always set aside as a week for honoring teachers and recognizing the lasting contributions they made to our lives and the lasting contributions they continue to make in the lives of […]

In case you were not aware, the week of May 4-8 was officially designated as Teacher Appreciation
Week. The first week of May is always set aside as a week for honoring teachers and recognizing the
lasting contributions they made to our lives and the lasting contributions they continue to make in the
lives of our children. Teachers change the lives of millions of children every day, and the work they do
each day moves us beyond words.

With the abrupt end to the physical school year, our teachers had to step up and do even more to
continue education with virtual classrooms and learning-at-home lessons. All to ensure every student
has the tools they need to reach their full potential. I have been amazed at the ease which our teaching
staff converted to distance learning and am truly appreciative of their ability to adapt so quickly. Our
teachers at St. Patrick School and in Catholic Schools across the country model the Gospels in all they
do. The relationships they build with our students affect them throughout their lives.

Unfortunately, it is more of a challenge for schools across the country to celebrate this week with most
states having cancelled in-person classes. I do have some suggestions of how you can celebrate and
show your child’s teacher how much you appreciate them and all that they do for your child(ren).

  • Send a Thank You Note: Feel free to send them a card the old-fashioned way via the U.S. Postal Service.
    It can be a store-purchased card or a handmade card by you and your child. If you are not comfortable
    sending a card via the U.S. Postal Service, do not hesitate to send them an online homemade thank you
    card via email or leave a thank you note in Google Classroom.
  • A “Thank You Parade”: Consider doing a parade with cars, which is a popular Covid-19 idea. The kids can
    create posters, wave out the window and say “thank you” to their teacher.
  • A Video Saying Thank You: Make a video saying, “thank you.” Email it to the teacher but also share it onyour personal Facebook page or ask your school to share it on their Facebook page.
  • Send a Gift Card: I am a big supporter of local businesses, so I encourage the sending of a gift card froma business in the greater Portland area. I suggest restaurants or places that offer a service such as nails,hair, massage therapy, etc.
  • Make Something as a Class: Have each child draw a picture or write a short paper explaining what theylike about their teacher. One parent can put it all together as a book so the teacher has a keepsake theycan look back on with fond remembrance of the school year.

Perhaps you have a better idea of how to thank and show appreciation for your child’s teacher. With
many people being forced to educate their own children at home, hopefully they have come to
appreciate the hard work our teachers put in each day. They often spend their own money and use their
own personal time. Even though our students are not physically in the classroom, our teachers are still
doing all that they can for your child and their well-being. Please take a moment of your time to
recognize diligent and hard working teachers, especially during these uncertain and unusual times. A
little appreciation will definitely go a long way.

Read More...

Covid-19 Teaches Us It’s Time to Learn Online Etiquette

April 28, 2020

With the Governor’s Stay Home, Stay Safe, executive order, many schools made the switch to educating their students online. With receiving an education at home comes online lessons and online meetings. With online meetings comes online etiquette, especially for those who must utilize their webcams for lessons or meetings. When one must be online working […]

With the Governor’s Stay Home, Stay Safe, executive order, many schools made the switch to educating their students online. With receiving an education at home comes online lessons and online meetings. With online meetings comes online etiquette, especially for those who must utilize their webcams for lessons or meetings.

When one must be online working on their webcam, what are some specific forms of etiquette one must utilize? Please allow me to be so bold as to make a few suggestions for all those school aged individuals who are having classes online:

  • Dress appropriately. I would recommend dressing professionally. A shirt is a must, even for males. For students, a t-shirt will suffice (with nothing inappropriate or offensive on it) as the bare minimum for most online meetings. Even though others in the meeting may not be able to see you from the waist down, one should also wear appropriate pants. It is also recommended that one does not look like they just stepped out of bed wearing their pajamas and having unkempt hair.
  • Make sure your camera is set up in a professional looking area. Please be aware of what is in the background. One does not want something in the background that is inappropriate. It is recommended you do not sit in front of a large window as the glare often makes it hard to see
  • Try to make sure there is a minimum amount of distractions. Loud televisions or radios, barking dogs, and screaming siblings can get in the way of the task at hand. Also, do not be distracted by your phone or any other items that may be in close proximity to you. When you are in a meeting with someone whether online or in person, it is best to keep distractions at a distance out of professional courtesy.
  • If you are in a group meeting, please make sure to keep quiet while others are talking or keep your microphone muted. Often, a wave of the hand, a nod of the head, or a thumbs up is enough communication to let your teacher know you are following along with the meeting.
  • It is recommended that you do not eat during an online meeting. Drinking of water or soda is acceptable, just don’t spill it on your keyboard.
  • Make sure you actually attend the meeting. Teachers only have so much time in a day and it is very difficult for busy staff members to schedule additional meetings.
  • Please be on time for the meeting and do your best to stay until the end. If your meeting starts at 1:00 p.m. You should be logged in by 12:55 p.m. so you are ready to go.
  • Make sure you are sitting appropriately so the person you are online with can see you throughout the meeting. Pretend you are meeting in person. One would not lie down or sit in an inappropriate position if you were meeting in person.
  • It is highly recommended that one is prepared for the meeting by having their work completed and ready to go. Having all necessary class materials and noting questions in advance that you will want to ask helps the meeting run even more smoothly.

For parents: When your school-aged children are online working with an adult or even with other students, it would be prudent for an adult to be in proximity to their children to monitor their activity. We can never be too safe in supervising our children while they are online whether it is with an adult or their peers.

If students follow these simple suggestions, they are sure to have an efficient, professional and productive online meeting. Make sure to stay safe during these unique and uncertain times. If I missed any tips on having a professional online meeting for students, please feel free to share your suggestions with me at randyhodge@portlandstpats.org

Read More...

Lifting our Voices in Song

March 10, 2020

Each March, the Diocese of Grand Rapids hosts an annual event called Songfest. All the fourth-grade students in the diocese are invited to West Catholic High School in Grand Rapids for a fun and exciting day.   This year, 461 students from 23 schools across the diocese participated in the 24th annual Songfest. The day […]

Each March, the Diocese of Grand Rapids hosts an annual event called Songfest. All the fourth-grade students in the diocese are invited to West Catholic High School in Grand Rapids for a fun and exciting day.

 

This year, 461 students from 23 schools across the diocese participated in the 24th annual Songfest. The day starts with the students gathering at West Catholic for rehearsal. Deacon Dennis Rybicki, director of liturgical music for the diocese, directs the program. He begins the day going through and explaining the music and has students practice all the songs they will be performing that evening. The students have all been practicing in their music classes before the big day. He is assisted throughout the program by Mr. Kevin Varner, principal of Our Lady of Consolation School in Rockford, and Ms. Cindy Thomas, principal of St. Stephen School in East Grand Rapids, as moderators.

 

Each fall, the 4th grade students are assigned a pen pal from another school from within the diocese. They write letters back and forth throughout the fall and winter. Then following morning rehearsal, they get to meet each other during lunch. This year, our students shared letters with students from San Juan Diego Academy.

 

After lunch, it is back for dress rehearsal. Deacon Dennis leads them through the program one more time trying to emulate their performance as close as it will possibly be for the evening performance.

 

After dress rehearsal, each school has open time to explore before the evening begins. For St. Patrick School, we visit Frederick Meijer Gardens. This time of year is perfect because we can check out the butterfly exhibit along with walking around to look at the various works of art in their gallery and on the campus.

 

After visiting Frederick Meijer Gardens, we have dinner at Applebees. Following dinner, it’s back to West Catholic for a little time to relax before for the big show.

 

The evening program begins with a welcome and prayer from our diocesan Superintendent Mr. David Faber. Fourth-grade students lead the singing of our national anthem. It’s then followed by songs including but not limited to Blessed Are They, the Fifty Nifty United States and Go Light Your World. It is always a student and crowd favorite when the students “make it rain.”

 

Our students are excited about this opportunity to participate in Songfest. It provides for a memorable day and it also gives them an opportunity to see they are part of something bigger and more than just our school here in Portland. It’s an experience they share with their classmates making memories that will last a lifetime.            

Read More...

St. Patrick Students Prepare for Lent

February 24, 2020

Lent, from the Middle English word Lentum, meaning springtime – the time of lengthening days, is a period of 40 days of fasting, prayer, almsgiving, and penitence before Easter. Lent began on Ash Wednesday, February 26 this year, and ends at sundown on Holy Thursday, April 9, when the Paschal Fast begins. Lent offers us […]

Lent, from the Middle English word Lentum, meaning springtime – the time of lengthening days, is a period of 40 days of fasting, prayer, almsgiving, and penitence before Easter. Lent began on Ash Wednesday, February 26 this year, and ends at sundown on Holy Thursday, April 9, when the Paschal Fast begins.

Lent offers us all a special opportunity to grow in our relationship with God and to deepen our commitment to a way of life, rooted in our baptism. It is an opportunity to reflect on our lives, pray more deeply, repent of the wrongs we have committed or in what we have failed to do, and to be charitable to those in need.

The students and staff at St. Patrick School have begun to spend time preparing for Lent.  Students and staff in grade preschool through 12 attended Ash Wednesday Mass with Fr. Mike.  The distribution of ashes reminds us of our own mortality and calls us to repentance. In the early Church, Ash Wednesday was the day on which those who had sinned and who wished to be readmitted to the Church would begin their public penance. The ashes that we receive are a reminder of our own sinfulness and many Catholics leave them on their foreheads all day as a sign of humility.  Some of the other activities that our students will be involved with during Lent are:

  • Stations of the Cross: Each Friday during Lent, students will come together and pray the Stations of the Cross. The Stations of the Cross are a Catholic devotion which commemorates the passion and death of our Lord Jesus Christ. Each of the fourteen traditional stations represents an event which occurred during Jesus’ passion and death on Good Friday.
  • Operation Rice Bowl: Middle school students put the Rice Bowls together and study some of the areas around the world and discuss how this program will help those affected areas. On Wednesday, April 1, the staff will serve our students lunch and the students will donate that day’s lunch money to the Rice Bowl.
  • Preschool students will be talking about and reading age appropriate books about Lent and Easter. Each day they will have a Lenten activity. They will collect coins throughout the Lenten season and the money will be donated to the Rice Bowls.
  • Students individually commit to fasting or performing acts of Christian service.
  • While students will not be attending reconciliation as a class, students have opportunities to receive this sacrament throughout Lent by attending during parish times. Fr. Mike will also be in the confessional on Fridays at 2:30 p.m. so secondary students may attend on their own after dismissal. Fr. Mike encourages all students in the 2nd grade or older to attend reconciliation with their families during the time that was already been mentioned. Other times include Tuesdays at 5:00 p.m. or on Saturdays at 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Lent is a time for all of us to focus on repenting from our sins and consecrating ourselves to God, not on trying to earn God’s favor or increase his love for us. It is our goal that all our student body and faculty be well prepared for the resurrection on Easter.

Read More...

Join Us in Celebrating Catholic Schools Week 2020

January 24, 2020

Since 1974, one week every year is designated as Catholic Schools Week nationwide. It always begins the last Sunday of January and runs through the following Saturday. This year we are celebrating from Jan. 27 – Feb. 2. During this week, Catholic school students, parents, and educators in the United States celebrate what makes Catholic […]

Since 1974, one week every year is designated as Catholic Schools Week nationwide. It always begins the last Sunday of January and runs through the following Saturday. This year we are celebrating from Jan. 27 – Feb. 2. During this week, Catholic school students, parents, and educators in the United States celebrate what makes Catholic Schools unique. The theme for Catholic Schools Week 2020 is “Catholic Schools: Learn. Serve. Lead. Succeed.”

This year, there are many reasons to celebrate our own Catholic school here in Portland as well as Catholic schools around the nation. Catholic schools offer academic excellence and faith-filled education where God is embraced and not marginalized. While some Catholic schools are challenged by declining enrollments and school closures, St. Patrick School continues to have a steady enrollment and Catholic schools in the Diocese of Grand Rapids also remain steady in their enrollments.

National test scores, high graduation and college attendance rates and other data show that Catholic school students outperform other students in both the public and private sectors. In addition, research from the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA) shows that 34% of millennials who attended a Catholic primary school are likely to attend Mass weekly, the number increases to 39% if they attended a Catholic secondary school, but the number drops significantly to only 5% if they have never attended a Catholic school. Not only are Catholic school students more likely to attend Mass weekly, they are more likely to contribute generously to charitable organizations.

We are excited to celebrate our Catholic School here in Portland. The success of our school is dependent on the support we receive from the greater Portland community.

Below is a calendar of the daily themes and celebrations that will take place at St. Patrick School throughout Catholic Schools Week:

Monday, January 27:

  • Preschool – 12th treated to donuts as we kick off CSW
  • Student dress-up day: Comfy Day

 

Tuesday, January 28:

  • Delegation of SPS students to attend Mass at St. Andrew Cathedral in Grand Rapids
  • All students will pray a candlelight rosary
  • Student dress-up day: Dress up as a Teacher

 

Wednesday, January 29:

  • Grades K-12 celebrate the Eucharist at 9:30 a.m. Mass
  • All students celebrate the “Souper Bowl” by bringing a donation of a nonperishable food item
  • Student dress-up day: Sunday Best

 

Thursday, January 30:

  • Ice Cream/Popsicles will be served to all students at lunch
  • Student dress-up day: Favorite Color Head-to-Toe

Friday, January 31:

  • Guest Speaker Dr. David Den Braber to speak to students in grades 6-12
  • Middle and High school students will celebrate with a pep assembly
  • Middle and High school students treated to movies/games in the afternoon
  • Elementary school students will celebrate with bowling
  • Student dress-up day: Shamrock Spirit Day – this will be a jean/spirit wear day for all students

Sunday, February 2:

  • Come celebrate with us as we end Catholic School’s Week at the 9:30 a.m. Mass.

We thank all of you for your generous support of St. Patrick School and ask that you keep our school in your prayers as we celebrate Catholic Schools Week. Please join us for all activities that are open to the public. At St. Patrick School, We Pray! We Learn! We Achieve!

Read More...

Celebrating the Successes of 2019

January 4, 2020

The end of the year always finds the circulation of many lists counting down the major events that happened. And before we ring in 2020, I would like to create my own list and look back at the top events for St. Patrick School during 2019. It would be impossible to rank them in order […]

The end of the year always finds the circulation of many lists counting down the major events that happened. And before we ring in 2020, I would like to create my own list and look back at the top events for St. Patrick School during 2019.

It would be impossible to rank them in order of importance, so they are listed randomly:

  1. St. Patrick School hired Mrs. Cortney Smith as our new PS-8th grade principal. Mr. Hodge will work as the high school principal and oversee our new advancement and development program. Mrs. Jenny Garcia, who filled in during the 2018-19 school year in a part-time role was hired as our new full-time school counselor for the 2019-20 school year.
  2. St. Patrick School launched an advancement and development program which will provide our current generation the opportunity to leave a legacy for future generations of Shamrocks.
  3. During the spring of her senior year, senior Annalise Gunderman was the track and field Division IV state champion in the 400-meter dash.
  4. The Class of 2019 graduated in May with 24 out of the 25 students enrolling in higher education with $534,295 in committed scholarship money. Six had a grade point average over a 4.0 and 24 out of the 25 had a grade point average over a 3.0. Three signed letters of intent to participate in college athletics.
  5. As the 2019 year was winding down, senior Olivia Fogarty and our school counselor, Mrs. Garcia, created a week of activities which helped our students and staff with awareness of issues relating to mental health which we called Mental Health Awareness week.
  6. We fully implemented our 1:1 Chromebook initiative by adding Chromebooks for our 6th and 7th grade students. All students in grades 6-12 now have a Chromebook assigned to them that they use for academic purposes.
  7. The varsity football team finished as state runner up in 8-man Division II. They advanced to the state finals before losing to 2018 Division I runner up Pickford in the Superior Dome in Marquette.
  8. A number of major projects were completed at St. Patrick School and Parish over the summer. This includes the installation of a new roof on the school and a new floor in the school gym. The pole barn destroyed by the tornado of 2015 was rebuilt and many smaller projects were completed throughout the parish.
  9. Freshman Cozette (Cozie) Brown set the school record in cross country medaling in four invitationals. She is the first female runner in school history to finish second team in our conference (CMAC) and to qualify for the state meet. She finished 75th in the Division IV state meet out of 238 runners. These accomplishments led her to be named the Portland Beacon Student Athlete of the Month for October.
Read More...

St. Patrick Elementary Students Attend NED Kindness Adventure Assembly

December 28, 2019

By: Mrs. Cortney Smith On Tuesday, December 3, St. Patrick K-8 students had a unique opportunity to attend a program that has been presented to students in all 50 states and across the world. It is performed in nearly 5,500 schools and encourages nearly 2.5 million kids worldwide each year. Preventing bullying in schools is […]

By: Mrs. Cortney Smith

On Tuesday, December 3, St. Patrick K-8 students had a unique opportunity to attend a program that has been presented to students in all 50 states and across the world. It is performed in nearly 5,500 schools and encourages nearly 2.5 million kids worldwide each year.

Preventing bullying in schools is as important today as it has ever been. The Kindness Adventure Assembly gets to the heart of bullying by showing that kindness is the key to making friends and respecting others.

This school-wide character education program, known as “The Kindness Adventure”, centers around a 45-minute assembly. The main goal is to create an awareness of kindness. During the assembly, students are introduced to a character known as N.E.D. He is a lovable cartoon character who is relatable.

During the assembly, the speaker, Matt, begins by introducing the students to N.E.D.

N.E.D. stands for Never Give Up, Encourage Others, Do Your Best

After the introduction, they tell a story which involves N.E.D. and Matt traveling to Kenya to demonstrate kindness. Throughout the story he used humor, audience participation and object lessons. Students were on the edge of their seat as the speaker integrates interactive media with Bidii Primary School in Nairobi, Kenya.  Together with N.E.D., Matt demonstrated the following:

 

Caring Is Cool

Include Others

I Can Make Friends Anywhere

Each Person Matters

Different Can Be Good

 

The speaker continually reinforced and integrated kindness, respect, and acceptance lessons that encouraged students to maintain kindness. It is emphasized that we all can show kindness just by giving a smile.

Students and teachers were excited by N.E.D. who is a simple, relatable, and a kid-focused character. Mr. Matt was an excellent presenter who got this message across in a humorous way.

The great thing about this assembly is that it is at no cost to the host school. The program only asks for you to hold a sale of Kenyan gear for a week after the show. Kindness gear includes three different types of artwork made by Kenyan artisans.  They use all the money earned as a “pay it forward” for the next school that wants an assembly, to pay for clean water in Kenya, and a small portion to the artisans for their talented work. Since the assembly, we have sold over 127 pieces. For more information on the show go to http://www.kindnessadventure.com/ and check out the free resources for students, parents, and teachers.

 

Read More...

St. Patrick Students Participate in Mental Health Awareness Week

December 18, 2019

According to a new study, published by the American Psychological Association, rates of mood disorders, especially anxiety, and suicide-related outcomes have increased significantly over the last decade among adolescents and young adults. Being aware of this increase in mood disorders, St. Patrick School dared to be different this past week and participated in Mental Health […]

According to a new study, published by the American Psychological Association, rates of mood disorders, especially anxiety, and suicide-related outcomes have increased significantly over the last decade among adolescents and young adults. Being aware of this increase in mood disorders, St. Patrick School dared to be different this past week and participated in Mental Health Awareness Week.

Each day of the week had a mental health concern associated with a specific color. Students wore shirts with the designated color each day. There were activities that were designated to go with each day. Here is a breakdown of each day’s color and activities:

On Monday, our students wore blue in recognition of those who struggle with depression. Students participated in a ”take what you need and give what you can” challenge where they were able to take phrases for themselves based on what they need in their life and/or pick an act of kindness to complete.

For Tuesday, students wore red in recognition of those who struggle with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). We held an assembly to discuss mental health and PTSD. Mr. Jim Geisen from the Right Door for Hope, Recovery and Wellness presented to our students. He used the remainder of his time to answer any questions our students had.

The middle and high school split into separate groups to do a “Cross the Line” activity. This helped students gain a visual of the differences and similarities they have with other students and reflect on the theme that every person has their own story.

Wednesday, students wore yellow in recognition of those who struggle with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). Students colored an awareness ribbon. Those that finished their drawing turned them in to our school counselor. One lucky winner had a chance to pie a teacher during our culminating activity on Friday.

Our pastor, Fr. Michael J. Alber did a great job of connecting his homily at our weekly high school Mass into our Mental Health Awareness theme. After Mass, our high school students and staff spent 15 minutes in Adoration providing our students an opportunity to pray and give their struggles, concerns and cares over to our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and to help them mentally focus and prepare for exam week.

For Thursday, students wore green in recognition of those who struggle with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Students had the opportunity to make a green braided bracelet or test their OCD tendencies by making a beaded bracelet without a pattern.

Finally, on Friday, students wore pink in recognition of those who struggle with anxiety. This was the day we found out what class had the highest participation throughout our Mental Health Awareness Week. Those classes with the highest participation had student representatives selected that were able to “pie” select teachers who agreed to be models of putting their fears and anxieties aside so students could pie them for a little fun. The freshman had the highest percentage and won 10 pies while the sophomores and juniors tied for second and won four pies each. Alexis Hilliard was the student whose awareness ribbon was chosen so she was also able to pie a staff member of her choice. Finally, students were able to make their own slime during lunch to create a stress/anxiety relief tool.  It was a fun and exciting way to end our week.

A very big thank you to senior Olivia Fogarty and our school counselor Mrs. Jenny Garcia for planning and leading our Mental Health Awareness Week activities. Also, a special thank you to all of the staff members who agreed to have a pie in their face. It was a great stress reliever for all as students get ready to take their exams, continue to celebrate and Advent and prepare for Christmas.

 

Read More...

Fall Sports Wrap Up

December 16, 2019

Before we get too far into the winter sports season, we want to recognize our student athletes’ accomplishments for our fall sports season. St. Patrick High School wrapped up another successful fall sports season with our annual awards banquet on December 3. The biggest highlight of the season was our football team finishing the regular […]

Before we get too far into the winter sports season, we want to recognize our student athletes’ accomplishments for our fall sports season. St. Patrick High School wrapped up another successful fall sports season with our annual awards banquet on December 3. The biggest highlight of the season was our football team finishing the regular season with an undefeated record and an overall 12-1 record as the 8-man football Division II state runner up. Our football team finished as state runner up two of the last three years.  We would like to congratulate all our teams for their efforts throughout this fall sports season! A lot of time and hard work was put forth in the gym, on the field and of course in the classroom by our student athletes.

As previously mentioned, the Shamrock football team had a strong season winning a regional championship trophy and advancing to the state final. Individual honors include:

  • Ned Smith: All-State Honorable Mention running back/defensive line
  • Zach Spitzley: Portland Beacon Athlete of the Month for November
  • Tyler Coyne: Tim Chamberlain Award
  • John Schneider: Bishop Baraga Award

The varsity volleyball team had another solid season finishing 5th place in the league in a very strong Central Michigan Athletic Conference (CMAC). They finished second in the silver bracket at the Dansville Invitational. Individual awards include:

  • Samee Teachworth: 1st team CMAC and Aquinas College Volleyball Commitment
  • Mya Luna: 2nd team CMAC and school record for 233 serving aces in her career
  • Olivia Fogarty: Honorable Mention CMAC
  • Ally Florian: Honorable Mention CMAC

Our cross country program was unable to field a girls’ or boys’ team, but we did have a solid group of runners representing our school’s cross country program. Individual honors include:

  • Cozette (Cozie) Brown: 2nd team CMAC, school record holder and medaled in four invitationals and Portland Beacon Student Athlete of the Month for October. She is the first female runner in school history to qualify for the state meet, finishing 75th in Division IV out of 238 runners.

Our JV volleyball team finished with an overall record of 21-7-5 and brought home a trophy for winning the gold bracket at the Perry Invitational. Our freshman volleyball team had a successful season showing much growth and finishing with an overall record of 10-8-4.

As a Catholic School, we expect our student athletes to represent our school in a positive manner, bringing Christ to everything they do, and making us proud with their sportsmanship. Without a doubt, they have done so in what turned out to be an extremely successful fall sports season. Our high school student athletes did an excellent job representing our school mission statement: We Pray! We Learn! We Achieve!

Read More...